Monday, January 03, 2011

Day 1

English 102 Lesson Plan Day 1

  1. Learning Begins with Questions.
  2. Three questions--to the left, about the class, about me.
  3. Three assumptions--to the right, about the class, about me.
  4. Pictures
  5. To the left: shirts--on the board.
  6. What are you going to do with your college education?
  7. Careers, current/anticipated on board.
  8. Syllabus read.
  9. There are used copies in the bookstore now, but limited supply. I'd like you to have TWIF 3.0 by Friday at the latest. This means ordering it online today. Also, libraries and bookstores will all have copies. Make sure you get the right copy: 3.0.
  10. A couple of additions: yvccenglish102.blogspot.com
  11. Office Hour 830-930
  12. Frequent BP offered, but only up to 100% of prewriting grade
  13. Homework 1: Read Advice to Students--print out your favorite and read it again with a pen/pencil and mark it as you read.
  14. Homework 2: Write a paragraph to a page of advice for English 70 students about college. Typed or handwritten ok. (5 points)
    1. BP: Post your paragraphs to the blog for one bp.
    2. All posts on the blog will be collected at the end of the month.
    3. Each comment is worth a point as long as it is on topic and over a sentence in length.
    4. If you have gmail, you can log on using that account. If not, you can easily sign up, but it's not required.

39 comments:

JoeTFischer said...

The first piece of advice I would give this intro English class is that it is not a high school class. Mr. Peters isn’t going to hold your hand through the process and go out of his way to make sure you’re on task. My advice: be responsible. To me, being responsible, organized, and willing to learn are the three things that every good college student needs. Without these things it is very easy to “fall through the cracks,” so to speak. I say this from experience. I didn’t have any of these traits in high school. It wasn’t until my first quarter of college that I acknowledged that I needed to make a change and take school much more seriously. For me, there is a great deal of pride and accomplishment that comes along with doing well at a college level.
Secondly, and more so for this class directly, come to class! It is crucial for learning the subject at hand, analyzing the book or literature your reading, and not losing participation points. If you’re a straight-A student and you miss five days of class the best you can do is a B, assuming you get A’s on all your essays. If that isn’t motivation for coming to class I don’t know what is. Plus, Mr. Peter’s makes class fun for the most part so it’s not like it’s painstakingly dull.

Micah Darnall said...

Advise to English 70 Students
My first and only advice is Study! High school is over you are now in college with adults, and you are no longer a kid. College is not easy; it’s a lot of hard work and studying time.in order for you to excel you have to be willing to put college first and foremost in your life; this means you should not expect to have a social life, to be able to work a fulltime job or Be able to play video games. You have to be willing to make these sacrifices to succeed in the highly competitive college atmosphere. But secondly you need to have fun and be expressive. Don’t be intimidated, everybody at college is human just like you and they are going through the same struggles as you are. Finally: you are unique and the world will benefit from your own unique ideas and experiences but you have to express them first.

maria said...

The best advice I can give to students in an English 70 class is to ask questions and have a good connection with your instructor. When I was taking other English courses I would be really confused at times. My instructors couldn’t help me because they had no idea that I was having trouble understanding the material. Keeping quiet about my confusion didn’t help me at all. My advice to you is to ask questions no matter how dumb you think they might be. If you’re too embarrassed to ask in class make an appointment with your teacher so you can address the issue in private. Asking your teacher for help will help you with your materials and make you have a good connection with your instructor. Once you have this connection, you can always go back and ask for help on other similar materials.

Kaylee said...

One thing you’ll quickly learn about college classes is that high school didn’t even begin to prepare you for them. You can no longer get away with just doing the minimum, beginning large assignments the night before they are due and sleeping through classes. You have to step up to the plate, take responsibility for your education (after all, it isn’t free anymore!), and most importantly always remember to stay organized!!
Another tip for English 70 students would be to stay positive! You’re not always going to like your professors. There are going to be ones you don’t get along with or whose opinions your may not agree with but it’s best to stay on their good side, don’t “buck the system”, so to speak.
The last piece of advice I have is to allow yourself plenty of time to do assignments, don’t wait until last minute because you may have underestimated how long it will take you. Stay on top of things, don’t procrastinate and never be afraid to ask questions when you don’t understand what the professor expects!!

hannah6870 said...

My advice to incoming English students is to not put off work until the last minute. It is very tempting to do but try not giving into the temptation as much as possible! It can make you very stressed when the due date approaches. Do the assignments the day they are assigned, even doing just a portion of the assignment is better than doing nothing. If you want to be successful in the class, pay attention in every class. Making friends in your classes is very beneficial, if you miss a day you can find out from them what happened. It’s also helpful to go over assignment requirements with a friend to understand it better and see it from a different prospective. Overall, just realize that you are there to learn, if you focus during class you will learn better and have more fun. Good luck!

cmgardner713 said...

As a mother, wife and returning college student after twenty years, my advice to new students is to finish college before starting a family. Growing out of puberty into adulthood presents plenty of interference and obstacles. Life itself is full of challenges and stress but nothing as stressful compared to raising a family and getting a college education simultaneously. (Let alone having to work on top of it all!)
Take your education seriously. Although it seems that these are the years to experiment and “enjoy life” it is a time to plant your feet and fill your head with knowledge. Whether you know your future career path or not, it is vital to put forth 110% effort into your course studies. Save partying for breaks between quarters. If you do not study outside of the classroom, chances are you will not be as successful. Take advantage of your professor’s knowledge and intellect. Do not be afraid to ask questions.

emilee said...

My advice to the English 70 students is to enjoy the class. Have fun while you can, get to know your teacher on a deeper level, understand them. Understanding your teacher could help you to understand the course better. Read, read, read, if you are given material to read, read it understand it, and ask questions. You are here to learn so don’t let the upperclassmen or women look down on you. Don’t be shy if you have an opinion, or question state it, ask it! Don’t be afraid you could be the start to something new. Studying outside of class is important too, yes we know you have lives but you need to dedicate some time to your studies or you wont get far. You will get stressed, but that’s just a part of life. Either go talk to your professor or just take a deep breath. College can be overwhelming but with great professors and new friends along the way you’ll make it and be great full you did.

Gaganjit Khinda said...

Advice for English 70 students
My first advice for English 70 students will be that come to class everyday and be on time. In my point of view, we learn something new every day and if you decide not to come to class, you will miss out with the learning. I would say that this is not the high school because in high school if we miss school, it doesn’t really affect the learning because the teacher gives you a chance to make up the work. In college, you will be lucky enough to even get till the end of the school day to turn in any assignment.
Moreover, college is not easy because all the teachers challenge you to do well in all the assignments. For English 101, I had Mrs. Forrest as a teacher and everybody knows that she’s a very tough teacher but I passed her class with a good grade. It only happened because I always paid attention to her lecture and to her tips about writing papers. I would say that college is all about writing papers and reading books. So always listen to your teachers because they have good advices that will help you with your learning.
Lastly, if your teacher doesn’t know what you need help with, how will they help you? So the big thing is ask questions, don’t be shy. Teachers are always ready to assist with anything you don’t understand. English is the major subject and it will really help you with your future. Don’t be embarrassed to talk to your instructor about any material that you don’t understand.
Good Luck with your future!

Janet Diaz said...

The first advice that I would give to English 70 students is not to expect a college English class to be as easy as a high school English class. If that is what students expect, then, the results will not be satisfactory. Students have to put all of their effort and beyond in a college English class versus in high school sometimes students are required to put little or almost no effort in an English class in order to earn a very satisfactory grade. The second advice that I would give these students is to turn in their assignments on time. Do not wait till the last minute to start thinking and typing what you are going to type in your paper, because this could also bring unsatisfactory results. In order to turn in a good assignment, students need to give themselves time to search, think, and look for many sources that can help earn a satisfactory grade. The third advice that I would give to these students is that they should always pay attention to their professor, not only when he or she is explaining what he is expecting of the assignments but also when he is lecturing. The last advice I would give to these students is to take notes!

mkschmack said...

As to incoming English students, there are many things to remember. You must maintain a sense of motivation all the way through your college career. It may seem like a drag when you come to do homework or read that assigned chapter that week. Honestly just do it, get yourself involved and there is no excuse for lack of time; we all know we have loads of time, just choose it wisely. If life is that hard that you can't get that chapter done or that assignment done, then there is no point in trying to glide your way through college. You need to have that motivating push that allows you to succeed and soar through your endeavors. Put your mind to it and eliminate anything distracting. Allow yourself to relate to at least something in which you are working on; it'll make your time more worthwhile.

Diana.Blizzard said...

One thing a college freshman should absolutely keep in mind is that college is practically no different than high school except for the fact that you are choosing classes that will assist and educate you in the career path which you are striving towards. I can definitely tell you that the assignments are no doubt, much more difficult and time consuming, but overall it’s the same concept. Just manage your time well and plan ahead so that you can get all the homework done. Also, a small pointer on how to become a better writer is: read more! Reading and writing are strongly connected and by reading more, even if you are unaware of it, you are expanding your vocabulary and picking up on good writing skills from various authors. This is the least I can help you, so figure the rest out for yourself, learn quickly, and good luck!

Jessica R. said...

Attention English 70 students (and any other incoming college students); the following advice is crucial to your survival and success. First and foremost, eat breakfast! There is nothing more distracting than a grumbling stomach. If your classes are between 8:00AM and 12:30PM, come at least 15 minutes in advance to find parking. Also, make sure there is always a dollar in the car. This can ensure a parking spot in the pay lot if time runs out and parking is scarce. Turn off your phone in class. Even when phones are set to silent, messages are still received and the urge to respond is strong. Do the assigned homework as soon as possible when the material is fresh in your mind. Don’t procrastinate! It shows in your work and the professors can tell the difference. Adapt to different teaching styles; every professor is different and the ability to learn from a wide variety is necessary. The reason you are here is to gain an education, take it seriously. The grades you earn truly matter. Learn to love learning! It helps to be excited that you develop and grow intellectually all the time. Most of all, keep stress at a minimum, the quality of your work can reflect a bad day versus a good one. Good luck!

alyssa shervey said...

When it comes to giving the students in the English 70 class advice three things come to mind. The first is being prepared. What this means is that you have read the materials that are assigned and have finished the homework before you get to class. It is very important to read the textbooks because teachers love to give quizzes on the material. The second piece of advice is to ask questions, this one is very important so do not be afraid to ask questions. Finally my last piece of advice is to show up for class every day and be on time. Being on time doesn't just mean being in your seat by the time class starts, it means to have your cell phone and Ipod put away and your class materials out and ready to use. If you can follow these three simple pieces of advice you will do great in your English 70 class.

edith.alvarez said...

I only have to pieces of advice I can give to an English 70 class. One is to not be afraid of rereading your own material or allowing others to proof read. We all feel self conscious about our writing but there is nothing to worry about even a well written essay could use some proof reading. So don’t be afraid to let others give you feedback about your writing, it will definitely help you in the end. The other is to not only read your required material once, but a couple of times. Yes it does take up some extra time but it will surely be easier to write essays and contribute to discussions when you understand the material completely.

Kaytee said...

The biggest advice I can give to any English student is absolutely do not wait until the night before something is due to finish it. Papers take a lot of work and effort to write and the more you revise something the better you will do. This can mean going back to a paper again and again which can seem completely repetitive but in the end it is worth it. Trust me, in any English class starting an essay or paper as soon as you receive it and going back to it multiple times is the key to a great grade.

Dave M. said...

My advice to new freshmen college students is three-fold: prepare, protect, and participate. Be sure to get enough sleep every day to allow your brain and body to stay connected. Provide the necessary time each day/week to keep up with reading and homework. Protect yourself from the temptation to steal time away from studies for socialization and activities; regulate your time to allow for all the essential aspects of a healthy life. Get involved in each class and be enthusiastic and interested – participate. It is so easy to lapse into the mindset that you’ll be able to keep up or catch up, but life starts coming at you real fast sometimes and without a firm grasp on your time you’ll go spiraling downward all too quickly!

Raymond said...

There is one piece of advice I can give to new college students. Do not forget to bring with you the basic skills that made you successful in high school. For example, the simple things that have helped me thus far are things like showing up on time, bringing all the materials needed in the class (no matter what you think the day requires), and attend class everyday you possibly can.
These last two quarters at school I have not missed a single day in any of my classes. It just makes it that much easier and really makes sense. Wouldn’t you agree that, unless it is an online class, the best way to learn is to come see what is being taught and learn it first hand?
Apart from coming everyday, I suggest doing every assignment no matter how much you struggle with any given one. It is better to learn at least something from all parts of a course, than it is to push an important lesson or topic aside and only focus on assignments in the class you predict yourself to do well on.
I would say my suggestions and advice given here are very simple. All you need to do is show up to class on time, be in class everyday the class is scheduled for, and complete all assignments even if you are struggling with the subject or concepts. But, do not forget that these three things just make going to school at a higher level easier, and will not result in guaranteed, proficient grades.

Sydney said...

If I had a cold fish to slap you in the face with, I would. You're lucky though, I'm fresh out of cold fish and I don't plan to get more any time soon. Instead I'll give you a little advise, something I think will be substantially less painful. Stop taking yourself so seriously. Relax a little and find your voice. Make your writing sound like you. Don't take the personality out of your writing for the sake of sounding more correct. If you're bored writing your paper, people are gonna be bored reading it. Writing is just talking on paper with a little more organization and analysis. If you don't use six syllable words in normal speech, stop using them in your writing. It'll sound stupid. Don't be so afraid of messing up or you'll never experiment and figure out what works. You never know if you're just one wrong voice away from truly finding yours. It's a nice groove to be in so get there as quick as you can and it'll put you ahead of your peers. There now, that was much nicer than a rainbow trout in the face, was it not?

bushyy0421 said...

My first piece of advice to new college students is that the best way to go through everything in life is to be calm. Freaking out and worrying too much never got me anywhere and it probably won’t help anyone else either. Being a high school Junior and going to college for the first time, I was a nervous wreck. I was so scared that I wouldn’t know what to do and I wouldn’t be able to keep up. However just after a couple of weeks, I realized I actually loved it and was doing really good in my classes. The teachers were incredibly nice and easy to talk to if a problem came up and if you listened during class everything else became very easy. Being nervous about doing something new is natural, but I’m here to tell you that college is really not that bad.
Another piece of advice I have is that if you’re not passionate about the subjects you’re taking; of course it’s going to be hard work. However, if you have a love for science then you will never have to do homework again! It’s important to keep this in mind because in the long run doing a job you love is better than one you hate! :)

Michael said...

Dear English 70 student,

Right now, college may just seem as another mandatory step into being hired into a good paying job. At least that was my idea of college when I was first starting out. I soon found however, that this fallacy led to no interest in my studies and thus no drive to excel. Thankfully, I have now found a direction and enjoyment in my education. I now have a narrower focus on what my education will be used for as well as what classes will help me achieve in things entirely unrelated to that field of study. My point to you is that if you are to succeed, it will be because you want to learn and discover new things about yourself and the world around you.

Curt Dutli said...

The best advice I can give to incoming English 70 students is to be accountable. You have to be much more accountable for your school work in college than in your high school days. Your instructor isn’t going to baby you and make sure you are getting your assignments complete, reminding you when assignments are due, and definitely not going to allow you to turn assignments in late. This was a shock for me, because in high school I got through by slacking and doing the minimal effort needed to pass the class. I really had to step up to the plate when I started classes at YVCC. It’s important you take notes, read, make time for studying, ask questions and not wait until the last minute to write an essay. Good writing takes time and shouldn’t be rushed, so you will need to set time aside outside of class in order to get the grade you strive for.

EmilyMurphy said...

My first piece of advice is that high school and college classes are very different. In college you can’t get by doing the minimum you have to work hard and do more than is expected. You can’t procrastinate because you won’t succeed. The teachers want you to succeed but they aren’t going to guide you through everything they want you to be able to learn on your own. If you miss class they won’t come tell you what you missed you have to take the initiative and find out yourself. In high school if you miss class a few times a week your grade most likely won’t suffer and your teachers will help you get caught up but not in college it’s different. They won’t be there to help you get caught up with everything and you will lose points for being gone. For example, in Mr. Peters class if you miss 5 days you will lose a whole letter grade. So coming to class is very necessary because you need to know the material and you don’t want to lose points. Lastly, always ask questions when you don’t understand. If you don’t understand what to do then you won’t be able to get good grades or learn the material.

Saul said...

You are in college! You’re taking English 70 and you’re worried about how tough it’s going to be. Well don’t be worried, if anything you should be excited about learning! Many people say that you are now an adult and that you should now be acting like one. Their right but they’re also wrong, absorb all of the information like a three year old and question everything that is unclear to you. By doing so you will find that the answers you seek will unfold before your eyes. Like a six year old indulges in candy you should as well indulge in the incredible new ideas that your new English class has to offer. This will spark topics that you are interested in and make your essays a whole lot better. It’s not high school English class but much better than that, it represents everything incredible of a never before seen complex world. -Saul Moran

CraftyRN said...

Advice for incoming college students......
College will be very different from high school. You will soon learn there are good teachers and some teachers you just don’t want to take. Research and discuss teachers with past students if possible. Once enrolled in a course, try to find used books to cut costs. College can be very confusing and overwhelming at first. You must ask questions. There are many experienced students willing to help and give advice. Be proactive and participate in class. Everyone has different intellectual strengths but someone can always learn from a question asked. At the first sign of struggle, see your professor. Take the initiative to approach them during office hours if you need more clarification about a topic being discussed in class. They want you to do well and will be more than willing to address your issues. Asking for help when needed is a sign of maturity, not weakness. I wished I had known as a freshman that getting a C in college is almost like getting an A in high school- almost. What I mean is that when you write a paper for the first time and get it back graded, you will most likely only receive a C, because your writing abilities are still that of a high school senior. Don’t panic. You still have time to improve your overall final grade. Sit in middle section of the first or second row in every class. This will drown out any distractions, giving you a better chance to focus on the discussions and note-taking, allowing you a better chance to perform well on your exams. Your monthly planner and assignment booklet are your new best friends. Use them everyday! Be very organized and use your time wisely, especially if there are jobs and kids as there will be lots of homework. Do not lose the class syllabus. This outlines the assignment dates and tests. Make at least one acquaintance in every class that you can depend on to take good notes and get a copy from should you need to miss class. Attend class regularly, even the boring ones! Study and don’t let yourself get behind as it is hard to get caught up.

Cecily said...

If somebody really is reading this someday, other than Mr. Peters of course who is probably shaking his head as he reads this, then I hope they pull themselves together for a moment long enough to at least attempt to appreciate that I wrote this for them. One might think this claim untruthful and that the true motive behind this wonderful piece of work is to impress my professor and boost my grade. That of course is both a ludicrous and horrid act of defamation and I am glad that I never have to meet such a person. The advice I feel compelled to share is based almost solely on my own opinion I must admit; however there still may be some salvageable advice amongst all of this superfluous repartee. Many try to warn new students to beware of the new and 'unpleasant' change that is about to take place. Although college is different from high school it is not something to be feared. Classes will be harder, but not unconquerable. Rather than try to prepare you by instilling fear into your tiny easily swayed brains, my hope is to excite you about all of the great and new possibilities you will have to further your education. You are at the prime of your life and, if you are in college, obviously already making smart choices. Now is the time to enjoy yourself and to try new things and to have fun. Learning is, despite many negative connotations in the minds of students, one of the most fulfilling things offered to us in life. Do not be afraid of it take advantage of it.

D_ana said...

This is my second year of college and the best piece of advice that I have gotten, and that I will now share with the English70 students, is to follow your heart, when considering a career. When people compare jobs, one of the first things that most of them do is compare the money each career will bring in. Yes, most of us are here to get a higher education, so that we can become successful and make a lot of money, but I believe that the number one thing that all college students should really be looking into are the things that they would love to do for the rest of their life. For example I love helping people, which is one of the main reasons why I want to become a nurse. I know that I would rather do something that I love to do and get paid less, than do something that I hate just for an extra few dollars. There is a greater satisfaction, than that of money, which is to do something that you know you can look forward to doing everyday.

Colby said...

My advice to an English 70 student would be that high school did not prepare you as well as it should have for what college professors expect of you. The professors aren't going to hold your hand and make sure that you are getting your work done, you have to be responsible. Also, I would tell an English 70 student to not waste your time at college and get everything you can out of each of your classes. At the time it may seem like you are never going to use the information that you're learning from an art appreciation class that you may be in, but everything that you learn has value and needs to be taken in.

Wade Brummett said...

The best advice I could give to an incoming English 70 student would be simply to remember that everything is your responsibility now, not the teachers. In my opinion, the most drastic difference from high school to college is that your grades are solely based on your input and effort to the class. College professors have nothing to lose if you decide not to show up and do your work. The best way I found to maintain your grades is simply to stay on top of your assignments and not fall behind. As soon as you start to procrastinate, the stress builds up on your shoulders like you wouldn’t believe. Just remember that you’ve only got so many classes until you are choosing exactly what you want to take rather than what you have to. Make the most of it and have fun.

Sarah Corn said...

My most useful advice I could give to English 70 students is to be attentive during class and listen to what the teacher is saying. The 50-minute class period should be used for your benefit, so make the most of it and ask questions when you need to. I find that active participation makes the homework so much easier and saves a lot of time. When writing papers, students should start writing early and break up the assignment into steps. It will make the paper way less stressful and sound prepared. Procrastination is not the answer; I know from experience! Also, it is important to use the Writing Center to your advantage! The people there are happy to help you and it always helps to get suggestions from "blind" readers outside of the class that could be helpful to your paper.

jadey80 said...

My first piece of advice is to be prepared to make a point. Whether in humanities, social sciences or natural sciences, you’re going to be asked to back up a (hypo)thesis, so hold your argument with strength. Use evidence to prove your point, but don’t be biased - show the other side of the argument as well.
DO. NOT. PROCRASTINATE. Read the text when it is assigned. Finish the worksheets before class. Start writing assignments early so you can give yourself time for improvement. If you did procrastinate in high school, it won’t work when you are trying to succeed in college courses. If you didn’t finish high school, use this opportunity as new way to learn and work.
Don’t be afraid to share your work, specifically with humanities classes. And especially with places that are meant to help you (i.e. writing center, tutors, teachers, etc.). When proofreading ANY kind of paper, read your work out loud - preferably around someone who is willing to listen.
Don’t be scared to ask questions. Don’t be afraid of your teachers - unless they are on some sort of ego trip, they are usually there to help you better yourself as a student and as a person. Take the time to talk to them before or after class, or during their office hours. Even if it’s a small question, it can save you from unwanted anxiety. Plus, teachers get stoked when students are actually interested in their class and want to better their college work.
Finally, hard work = proud work (the healthy kind of pride that is). Don’t be afraid to be excellent.

kyleklaassen said...

The first thing that i have to say to english 70, that i would assume are incoming freshman just out of HS is that this not a HS class... YOu have to take this a lot more serious. I am a running start student and this is my second year so i will graduate HS with my AA but truthfully i slacked off my first year and i really wish i hadn't it has made things a lot harder. So i just have to say dont slack off at all!!! i warn you its harder than you think... HS is a joke they teach you how to slack and makes life easy. You do have to actually try in College. make sure you redy yourself. and push yourself for what you want to be (career goals)dont let anybody tell you that you cant be that or you wont make it. Wish you all the best of luck. :)

-Kyle

Carmen E Johnson said...

The first sprinkle of advice I would like to gladly give is to never assume that you know everything. That is a great recipe for disaster and will get you not far at all. Nobody likes a know it all! The second one is to never....ever...never ever be afraid to ask a question...even if you think it sounds dumb. There is no such thing...right? The third is to make sure that you take notes and if you write slow........record it. The fourth is to Not be afraid to an "English For Dummies" book if you need to. These books have kept me at a "B" average many times. Your not Dumb....you just lack information on certain topics. And my last one is.....be respectable to your fellow classmates and to your instructor. That's all I have for now..and by the way. Your zipper is undone. To your back pack that is. Meaning don't listen to everything another student tells you....research for yourself, and in the process you might just something.

Ethan said...

The single most important advice I have to give is to double check your study habits. Studying is something we all must do, and in every single class we will take. Procrastination is something that should be warded off right from the start. The best way to study for something is to prepare early. Preparing for an exam thirty minutes a day is better for you than that last ditch five hour cram session. This is because your brain tends to retain better the first and last of the things that you go over. So broken up into many firsts and lasts, the information is retained better and can be conjured up easier.

random.bch said...

With being in my second year of college at YVCC, I almost could not comprehend on how much I have grown since I had first enrolled. I went to a college that I knew no one at, had no connections, no one in my family for advice, and lastly having no knowledge myself from dropping out of high school. The biggest thing I have learned, talk to other students and find out which teachers are the energetic and love the subject that he or she teaches. For me at least, it was critical to have a interesting teacher. Trust me just because they teach at a college, doesn’t mean they enjoy teaching that subject that day. Try to find which ones enjoy waking up with a smile on their face waiting to build their students minds a little more that day. To have a instructor that enjoys helping students.
Secondly, I have learned that just because it’s not due for two weeks, doesn’t mean you have a week and five days of no homework. It has an extended date for a reason. I found out, even just thinking about the paper a little during another lecture or even when you’re driving. Try to get a simplistic idea or even start a mental outline of what you’re your tentatively planning on writing; your outline will have changed drastically on any comprehensive paper.
Lastly I would say try to study as much as possible on campus. I say this because when you are doing homework or doing some last minute cramming on test day, you will have raised a couple of questions. When these questions arise, on campus you have multiple options of going to the library, one of the study labs (if available), lastly you always have your instructor. At home your options are limited and when a hard spot comes, Television always sounds better.

frnkburns2@gmail.com said...

Passion, Dedication, and responsability... three key elements that Mr. Peters conveys in each course that he teaches. Do these things and you can't go wrong. You may discover new things about yourself, because I did while in Mr.Peters english 101 class. He is an awsome instructor and his passion will help you grow on your path of self discovery. Just remember, Passion, Dedication, and responsigility, and you cant go wrong.

alejandra.orozco15 said...

The best advice I can give the Ensligh 75 class is that college is a learning experience and you should know that you can't avoid all the mistakes you will make but you can reduce the amount by taking advantage of the writing center. College is all about discovering yourself and learning on your own away from your parents. Enjoy it, stay focused, and learn to laugh at yourself most of all have some fun. Asking questions may save you a letter grade!!
Another important advice is learning to budget yourself. Budgeting is hard, especially when a college freshman is in an environment where peers do not have to budget. You will notice other students who spend all their parents money, have the nicest clothes, always have money to spend, and you think it’s not fair. Well it isn't, but you have to do the best you can with what you have. The idea is to budget your money for the semester, and try to stretch your money as far as you can.

alejandra.orozco15 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Kristie said...

My advice to English 70 class students is to never give up. It is much easier to get your education when you are young. As another student commented, it is harder to accomplish this task once you are married and have a family. It is not impossible but definitely more difficult. It seems like life can side track you with many obstacles, challenges and expectations. It never fails that when it is finals week your car will break down or a big family event will be scheduled that you absolutely must attend. Remember, there will be time for family functions when you are finished. If you let these things pull you away from your studies you may not achieve the grades that are required to transfer on to a four-year university or to get into the program that you want. This is the time to put you first. You and only you can decide what your education experience will be or if you will finish.
It has been proven that those with a degree earn more money than those without. To make a long story short, you need to make the sacrifice now for just a short time so you can reap the benefits of a job with higher income later. However, with that said, life may throw you a curveball and you may not finish your education. Do not give up. Take just one class at a time or take them at a later stage in life. You are never too old to learn. Speaking as an older student, I can tell you that I have learned more and appreciated more by finishing my classes later on in life. As they say, life is a journey, not a destination.

rachel.m.johnson said...

my comments have not been posting..just testing from a different computer to see if it will work