Friday, February 20, 2009

College Dropout Boom Questions

College Dropout Boom Questions

  1. What was Andy Blevins doing in the summer of 1995?
    b. Where had he been before taking the job at the supermarket warehouse?
    c. What was his wage? How did it compare with that of his parents?
    d. What decision was he faced with after he started working?
    e. What is one of the largest and fastest-growing groups of young adults in America?
    f. What statistic about Americans in the mid-20's has shown a marked change?
    g. Why has the American system of higher learning been considered "a great equalizer"?
    h. According to the article, what effect does economic advantage appear to have on graduation rates?
    i. What trend did the Department of Education discover in a recent study?
    j. How action has Lawrence H. Summers taken in response to the news of a widening gap between rich and poor students?
    k. How are poor and working-class students faring in a climate wherein more people are earning college degrees?
    l. Why does a college education seem to matter more now than it once did?
    m. How has the trend in economic mobility changed over the last generation?
    n. In what ways are colleges increasingly diverse? In what ways are they not?
    o. How do you interpret the "joke" about diversity at Harvard?
    p. What effect might a person's upbringing have on his or her expectations concerning college?
    q. What disparity in income can be seen between a college graduate and a non-graduate?
    r. What are some of the barriers to higher education for students from low-income families?
    s. How has the University of Virginia attempted to help students from low-income families?
    t. What steps is Leanna Blevins taking to help students from low-income families?
    u. What effect has affirmative action had on college admissions?
    v. What changes to the affirmative action policy have been proposed?
    w. How does Mr. Blevins describe the positive and negative aspects of his life?
    x. In what ways is the "conventional wisdom" about equality in education "not quite right"?
    y. What challenges do colleges faces in determining how or whether to help students from low-income families?
    z. What decision is Mr. Blevins facing, and what action has he taken so far?

19 comments:

Eric Manzo said...

It is hard to go to college when you have a good paying job. You don't see the need when your making enough money to support yourself but then you put it off for to long and realize how important it truly is. I could say I went through a situation like Andy's. I put off college I to join the army. I learned leadership skills but the job I did in the army really didn't help me in the civilian world. But I am glad I have the opportunity to be in college though.

scott said...

that is why it is best to get your schooling done right out of highschool, or even during highschool. running start is an ammazing program that many people should, but dont take advantage of.

Kirsten said...

I completely agree Scott. I am a running start student and I am so glad that I took advantage of the program. Two years after I graduate High School, I could have a teaching degree and be making money instead of spending it on college tuition. It is a great program.

LindsyM. said...

I don't understand why parents don't push their children to go to college. In today's society unless you want to be working at burger king for the rest of your life you have to go to college. A high school degree alone isn't cutting it anymore. Employers are expecting more out of their employees.

dianna.l.beaulaurier said...

I never really understood the importance of going to college when I was in highschool. I had my teachers and counselors always nag me, but never so much my parents. They were happy when I got accepted to a four year university when I graduated from high school. Deep down I know that they were feeling guilty about not being able to afford tuition let alone my car insurance, thats why I had to get a job when I was a junior in highschool. I put my studies behind school because I was having to pay for all my expenses that comes with being an adult. It was not fair, I feel cheated from opportunities because my parents did not give me a stable home. I would have loved to do running start but the fact was I never understood the importance of college at that moment. Everyone goes...yeah...but I was not ready or able. I wish that my teachers, counselors, peers, parents, or someone would have pushed me into the program. I am 23 almost 24 and am finally almost done getting my AA because of my decision to put college off after high school for abit. I guess I never really thought it was possible to achieve your dream.

Barry W. said...

im watching notoriouse right now.. and they swear aloy.. and no i did not download it illegally :)

Dave said...

I happen to think the Running Start program is a waste of tax money. it seems to me, that its an indicator of the failing of America's high schools. Additionally the work ethic of most of the Running Starters is lackadaisical at best, they don't bring books, want preferential treatment and often complain about the workload. This isn't to say that I haven't met some downright amazing Running Starters, it is just few and far between.

Jaime said...

I also am in running start and think it is a great program that gives many benefits to students and helps reduce college costs. Its amazing though that not very many people at my school haven't taken this kind of advantage. Running start is more stressful but it will be worth it in the end.

tonya said...

no one said that college is easy, or that it was supposed to be. after school for 12+ years, the thought that you have more challenging years of school left really wears on you. personally i would and i know many people what would agree, just getting a job and stop going to school so you can make and save money without the expense of college sounds a lot better than coming away from college itself in thousands of dollars worth of debt. but oh well, its just one of those things you have to do to make it by in our world today

SamWofford said...

um yeah running start is such a waste of money, who could possibly want high schoolers to have a chance to get a better education? That would be so wrong, right? Who doesn't complain about the workload, is it just running start people? The only people who complain about RS is people who didn't do it in high school and wish they had. Excuse me while I go put on my RS shirt to attract attention and go jump off a bridge because I have to much homework...

Kirsten said...

LOL!!! Too funny Samantha, I completely agree! who doesnt stay up till 2 AM finishing homework. Either our money from the government goes to our high schools or to the college. Sorry if we are looking for a challenge.

SamWofford said...

Yeah, Kirsten I wonder how tax money got thrown into this because it is our high schools that are losing money. Everyone has to enroll in school, so the Gov. gives money to our high school and since we chose to go to college, our high schools can't get that money.And we have to buy our own books and don't get fi. aid. So my question is who pays for Fi. aid? Could it be tax payers?hmmm

Kirsten said...

Everyone is getting some sort of government support when they are in college. Even if you are paying for 100% of your books, credits, lab fee's etc. The government is still picking up 1/4th of that. Hmmmmm, i think the waste of government funding is coming from the college droupouts!

SamWofford said...

Okay I agree, I'll stop arguing. The college dropouts aren't helping the situation at all.

Alycia said...

To add to the "Running Start" debate...I would have to both agree and disagree with everyone. For starters- yes, I am a Running Start student. A waste of tax dollars is definetly offending, considering its so beneficial to those who more than likely will succceed far beyond their (highschool) classmates. True, it may be due to public education failing, and not to say that should not be fixed but there are those who need a greater challenge or simply want to get out of high school. In all honesty however, there has yet to be a YVCC class that has seemed any more challenging than any AP class I have taken at the highschool. (No offense to any teachers here). In fact, there have been classes at YVCC that i consider much more easy than HS classes. So at times those Running Starters may not have books or show up becuase it all is to easy. And finally, I have never met a Running Start student who wants more attention for being so. Who wants to admit they're in highschool amongst "college" students?

Dianna said...

I have another comment to add about the running start debate, I can see what your saying Dave about having our money wasted on running start students but maybe its a good thing. Think about this, if we send our high school students to college, when they are still in high school, these students are going to figure out sooner rather than later what direction in their life they want to go. Yes, they get two years free but if they feel like college is not for them and they drop out while they are still in high school these students are going to know what they can or cannot accomplish. If they can accomplish college then they will probably graduate, but if they don't they soon will know that college is the only thing besides finding a rainbow with a pot o gold somewhere that will get them some where in life, for the majority of society.

Dianna said...

I personally think running start is a great program.

Dave said...

I would just like to add that, for future reference, all comments posted by me are for bonus point purposes only and do not necessarily reflect the views of the author.

Alycia said...

well i do not get bonus points for this because the blog is from february, but thanks dave. Although not a direct apology...I definitly can relate.